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Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, Part 1 (ENG500A)

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition, Part 1 (ENG500A)

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Quick Overview

This course is currently closed for new enrollments.

In this AP English course, students learn to understand and analyze complex works by a variety of authors. They explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They also learn about their own composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing, and continuing through editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to academic, personal, and professional contexts.

Teacher-Led Course (one-time payment)   $475.00

Monthly Fees: Due Today:

Price as configured: $0.00

Details

Course Overview

In this AP English course, students learn to understand and analyze complex works by a variety of authors. They explore the richness of language, including syntax, imitation, word choice, and tone. They also learn about their own composition style and process, starting with exploration, planning, and writing, and continuing through editing, peer review, rewriting, polishing, and applying what they learn to academic, personal, and professional contexts. In this equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.


Course Outline

SEMESTER ONE

Unit 1: Getting Started

Students learn what to expect on the AP Exam in English Language and Composition, explore how the English language has evolved over time and how written and oral language relate to one another. They compare written works from different historical periods and identify various trends in written English.

  • Course Introduction
  • Language Basics

Unit 2: Reading Techniques

Students explore different reading techniques, including critical reading. They learn tips and techniques to use when reading and how critical reading can help when analyzing a piece of work. They learn about rhetorical devices used by writers and how rhetorical patterns and figurative language are used to create irony and satire.

  • Critical Reading
  • Recognizing Rhetoric
  • Rhetoric, Part 2

Unit 3: Writing Techniques

Students focus on college-level writing and focus on writing mechanics, including common grammatical issues. Students look at the building blocks of any essay thesis statements and paragraphs and the writing process as a whole, from prewriting to writing to revising.

  • College Writing
  • Writing Mechanics, Documentation, and Citation
  • Writing Fundamentals
  • The Writing Process

Unit 4: Forms of Prose

Students examine the characteristics of various types of writing, including personal and reflective writing, expository writing, analytical writing, and persuasive writing. They learn about different modes of expository writing, using close reading to analyze a piece of literature, and detecting persuasive elements.

  • Personal and Reflective Writing
  • Expository Writing
  • Analytical Writing
  • Persuasive Writing

Unit 5: Review and Exam

Students review what they have learned and learn how to prepare for multiple-choice and free-response test questions, then take the semester exam.

  • Review
  • Exam

SEMESTER TWO

Unit 1: History and Narrative

Students learn about historical and narrative writings, including biographies and autobiographies. They learn the conventions of these genres and why they're important to the study of history. They also learn to write historical essays and about historical events.

  • Autobiographies and Biographies
  • History

Unit 2: The Reading Public

Students take a look at essays, how they've developed and changed through time, and how to analyze and compare those from different time periods and writers. Then they focus on the study and analysis of mass media, including the role and influence media has on our culture, ethical issues related to the media, the role of advertising and editorials, and how to read and write about film. They learn about political and governmental writing and explore culture and cultural criticism.

  • Essays Through Time
  • Media Analysis
  • Politics and Government
  • Cultural Criticism

Unit 3: The World Around Us

Students learn about scientific, philosophical, and religious writings, including the objective nature of scientific writing, the abstract nature of philosophical texts, and the different characteristics of religious writings.

  • Science and Nature
  • Philosophy and Religion

Unit 4: Literature

Students learn about the structure and elements of poetry and short fiction, and how to read, analyze, and write about both genres.

  • Poetry
  • Short Fiction

Unit 5: Review and Exam

Students review what they have learned and solidify skills for answering multiple-choice and free-response test questions, then take the final exam.

  • Review
  • Exam

Additional Information

Course Length 4 Months
Prerequisites No
Course Materials No
Course Start Date

Courses Taught by a K12 Teacher

Courses with a teacher have designated start dates throughout Fall, Spring, and Summer. Full-year courses last 10 months and semester courses last 4 months. Courses are taught by teachers in K12 International Academy. For details on start dates, click here.

Teacher Assisted Yes, this course is taught by a K12 International Academy teacher. If you are looking for a teacher-supported option with additional flexibility and year-round start dates, click here to learn about the Keystone School, another K12 online private schooling option.
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To use this course, you'll need a computer with an Internet connection.  Some courses require additional free software programs, which you can download from the Internet.

Hardware and Browsers (Minimum Recommendations)

Windows OS

  • CPU: 1.8 GHz or faster processor (or equivalent)

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0 or higher, Mozilla Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher

  • At this time our users are encouraged not to upgrade to Windows 10 or Edge (the new browser)

 

Mac OS

  • CPU: PowerPC G4 1 GHz or faster processor; Intel Core Duo 1.83 GHz or faster processor

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher (Safari is not supported!)

Internet Connections

It is highly recommended that a broadband connection be used instead of dial up.