Phone: 855.534.6298 Cart
0item(s)

You do not have any courses in your Wish List. Choose from popular suggestions below or continue with Subject or Grade

POPULAR SUGGESTIONS

Product was successfully added to your Cart.

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition, Part 2 (ENG510B)

Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition, Part 2 (ENG510B)

Add to WishList

Quick Overview

In this AP English course, the equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students are immersed in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students read and write daily using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and discussions. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition. This is the second semester of ENG510.

Teacher-Led Course (one-time payment)   $475.00

Monthly Fees: Due Today:

Price as configured: $0.00

Details

Course Overview

In this AP English course, the equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, students are immersed in novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods. Students read and write daily using a variety of multimedia and interactive activities, interpretive writing assignments, and discussions. The course places special emphasis on reading comprehension, structural and critical analyses of written works, literary vocabulary, and recognizing and understanding literary devices. Students prepare for the AP Exam and for further study in creative writing, communications, journalism, literature, and composition. This is the second semester of ENG510.



Course Outline

SEMESTER ONE

Unit 1: Getting Started

Students learn about elements of the AP English Literature and Composition Examination and begin their preparation for university courses in literature, composition, and creative writing. This unit introduces the techniques of critical and close reading and the writing process, including strategies for prewriting, writing, and revising.

  • Course Introduction
  • The Reading and Writing Processes

Unit 2: Fiction and Poetry: Literature of Examination

Students read a selection of short stories and poems with the theme of personal exploration from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds. They learn about figurative language, stream-of-consciousness writing, point of view, race in literature, and forms of short fiction. They will learn about tone, mood, and attitude in poetry and literary devices used by poets.

  • Stories of Personal Exploration
  • Poems of Faith and Doubt

Unit 3: Drama: Lives in Crisis

Students are introduced to drama with Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen and A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams. In addition, they will read about Ibsen and his realistic style, explore how plays are structured, and learn how to write about drama. They learn about character development, dialogue, and paraphrasing dramatic dialogue and action.

  • Hedda Gabler
  • A Streetcar Named Desire

Unit 4: Poetry: Love and Separation

Students read poetry selections dealing with love and separation. They read and interpret two classic Renaissance poems, and learn about different forms of poetry, classical allusions, and how to identify a poem's speaker. They learn about tone, mood, and attitude as they read four contrasting poems and examine love from the perspectives of modern poet Edna St. Vincent Millay and contemporary poet Cathy Song. They also learn about poetic structure, sound patterns, rhyme scheme, alliteration, and imagery.

  • Love Desired
  • Love Questioned
  • Love Denied

Unit 5: Long Fiction: Their Eyes Were Watching God

Students read the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, one of the most prominent American writers of the 20th century. They learn elements of magical realism and how dialect is used in fiction, explore how memory and time work in fiction, and learn how history influences and is reflected in literature. They also explore the function and structure of endings, read more about using textual evidence to support ideas, and learn helpful tips for writing about long fiction.

  • Their Eyes Were Watching God , Chapters 1 - 10
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God , Chapters 11 - 20

Unit 6: Drama: Shakespearean Comedy

Students read William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, one of his best-known comedies. It's a tale of disguise, deception, mistaken identity, and the strange things people believe when they're blinded by love. Students learn to interpret Shakespeare's language, begin to recognize the conventions of Shakespearean drama, and consider the influence of motive and desire on a character's development.

  • Twelfth Night , Part One
  • Twelfth Night , Part Two

Unit 7: Review and Exam

Students review what they have learned and learn how to prepare for multiple-choice and free-response test questions, then take the semester exam.

  • Review
  • Exam

SEMESTER TWO

Unit 1: Victorian Era Literature

Students learn about life and literature during the Victorian Era, focusing their attention on its dominant literary form???the novel. They read Charlotte Bronte's highly acclaimed Jane Eyre.

  • Jane Eyre , Chapters 1 - 16
  • Jane Eyre , Chapters 17 - 27
  • Jane Eyre , Chapters 28 - 38

Unit 2: 19th-Century Literature: British and American Authors

Students learn about British Romanticism and its influence on American writers, and about the American transcendentalist movement. Romanticism is studied through the poetry of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and John Keats. The work of the American transcendentalists reflects a movement to define spiritual and religious beliefs with new discoveries and new modes of thought in an era of change.

  • British Authors
  • American Authors

Unit 3: Turn-of-the-Century Literature

This unit focuses on turn-of-the-century literature in both Britain and America. Students focus on a turn-of-the-century short story by Joseph Conrad, "Heart of Darkness," which tackles the controversy over imperialism by presenting a bleak look at the economic exploitation of Africa. Students also study Charlotte Perkins Gilman's short story "The Yellow Wallpaper," which depicts a woman's increasing mental confusion after she's treated for depression with "the rest cure" and forbidden to do any activities.

  • Fiction and Analysis, Part 1
  • Fiction and Analysis, Part 2

Unit 4: Modern Literature

Students read the work of Irish, American, and English poets, all concerned with changes of social order, the fragmentation of experience, and new ways of presenting poetry. Students sharpen their skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about poetry.

  • Modern Poetry, Part 1
  • Modern Poetry, Part 2

Unit 5: The American Dream

Students read The Great Gatsby and other literature that explores the notion of the American dream. In addition to being an intriguing mystery, The Great Gatsby gives a clear picture of one part of 1920s America. Students also read two poems by Langston Hughes, an important poet of the Harlem Renaissance.

  • The Great Gatsby , Chapters 1 - 5
  • The Great Gatsby , Chapters 6 - 9

Unit 6: Contemporary Literature

Students read contemporary literature, including short stories by American and international authors, and the novel Annie John. These stories address the experiences of various groups within and outside American culture, and the effect of diverse backgrounds and cultural perspectives on literature.

  • American Voices
  • International Voices

Unit 6: Contemporary Literature

Students read contemporary literature, including short stories by American and international authors, and the novel Annie John. These stories address the experiences of various groups within and outside American culture, and the effect of diverse backgrounds and cultural perspectives on literature.

  • American Voices
  • International Voices

Unit 7: Review and Exam

Students review what they have learned and solidify skills for answering multiple-choice and free-response test questions, then take the final exam.

  • Review
  • Exam

Additional Information

Course Length 4 Months
Prerequisites N/A
Course Materials No
Course Start Date

Courses Taught by a K12 Teacher

Courses with a teacher have designated start dates throughout Fall, Spring, and Summer. Full-year courses last 10 months and semester courses last 4 months. Courses are taught by teachers in K12 International Academy. For details on start dates, click here.

Teacher Assisted Yes, this course is taught by a K12 International Academy teacher. If you are looking for a teacher-supported option with additional flexibility and year-round start dates, click here to learn about the Keystone School, another K12 online private schooling option.
  1. Be the first to review this product

To use this course, you'll need a computer with an Internet connection.  Some courses require additional free software programs, which you can download from the Internet.

Hardware and Browsers (Minimum Recommendations)

Windows OS

  • CPU: 1.8 GHz or faster processor (or equivalent)

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0 or higher, Mozilla Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher

  • At this time our users are encouraged not to upgrade to Windows 10 or Edge (the new browser)

 

Mac OS

  • CPU: PowerPC G4 1 GHz or faster processor; Intel Core Duo 1.83 GHz or faster processor

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher (Safari is not supported!)

Internet Connections

It is highly recommended that a broadband connection be used instead of dial up.