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American Government, Credit Recovery (HST406)

American Government, Credit Recovery (HST406)

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Quick Overview

This one-semester credit recovery course covers the historical backgrounds, governing principles, and institutions of the government of the United States. The focus is on the principles and beliefs that the United States was founded on and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. In American Government, students examine the principles of popular sovereignty, separation of powers, checks and balances, republicanism, federalism, and individual rights. They also learn about the roles of individuals and groups in the American political system.

Teacher-Led Course (one-time payment)   $425.00

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Details

Course Overview

This one-semester credit recovery course covers the historical backgrounds, governing principles, and institutions of the government of the United States. The focus is on the principles and beliefs that the United States was founded on and on the structure, functions, and powers of government at the national, state, and local levels. In American Government, students examine the principles of popular sovereignty, separation of powers, checks and balances, republicanism, federalism, and individual rights. They also learn about the roles of individuals and groups in the American political system. Students compare the American system of government with other modern systems and assess the strengths and problems associated with the American version.


Course Outline

Unit 1: Our American Government

Students explore various forms of government. They evaluate society's need for government and what functions it should have. They explore the structure of the Colonial government, the Articles of Confederation, the Founding Fathers, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

  • What is Government?
  • Origins of American Government
  • Structure and Principles of Government
  • Amending the Constitution

Unit 2: Legislative and Executive Branches

Students examine the congressional system, including the powers of Congress. They examine the structure of the executive branch, including the role and power of the president, the offices and positions of the cabinet, and the role of key executive departments in running the federal government. They also learn the process by which a bill becomes a law.

  • Structure and Powers of Congress
  • Structure and Powers of the Executive Branch
  • Departments and Organization of the Executive Branch
  • How a Bill Becomes a Law

Unit 3: The Judicial Branch and Civil Law

Students examine the structure, powers, and appointments of the judicial branch. They learn about key Supreme Court justices and their decisions. They examine rights guaranteed by the First Amendment, including due process and procedural guarantees. They analyze case law protecting civil liberties and key events in the struggle for civil rights.

  • Structure of the Court System
  • The Supreme Court
  • Civil Liberties
  • Civil Rights

Unit 4: Political Participation

Students learn the role of political party systems and evaluate the workings of a two-party system. They compare and contrast the Democratic and Republican parties and learn the steps that a candidate must go through to gain the party's nomination for president. They learn the campaigning process, the role of the Electoral College, the groups that make up the electorate, and role of interest groups.

  • Political Parties
  • Nominations and Campaigns
  • Elections
  • Individual Political Participation

Unit 5: Economics and International Relations

Students examine the U.S. role in a global economy. They learn sources of government revenue and expenditures. They examine economic problems, the role of the Federal Reserve, and the process of creating the federal budget. They study the impact of foreign policy and the purpose of international organizations.

  • Economic Systems and the U.S. Economy
  • Revenue and Expenditures
  • Budget-Making Process
  • Foreign Policy

Additional Information

Course Length 12 Months
Prerequisites N/A
Course Materials No
Course Start Date

Courses Taught by a K12 Teacher

Courses with a teacher have designated start dates throughout Fall, Spring, and Summer. Full-year courses last 10 months and semester courses last 4 months. Courses are taught by teachers in K12 International Academy. For details on start dates, click here.

Teacher Assisted Yes, this course is taught by a K12 International Academy teacher. If you are looking for a teacher-supported option with additional flexibility and year-round start dates, click here to learn about the Keystone School, another K12 online private schooling option.
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To use this course, you'll need a computer with an Internet connection.  Some courses require additional free software programs, which you can download from the Internet.

Hardware and Browsers (Minimum Recommendations)

Windows OS

  • CPU: 1.8 GHz or faster processor (or equivalent)

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0 or higher, Mozilla Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher

  • At this time our users are encouraged not to upgrade to Windows 10 or Edge (the new browser)

 

Mac OS

  • CPU: PowerPC G4 1 GHz or faster processor; Intel Core Duo 1.83 GHz or faster processor

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher (Safari is not supported!)

Internet Connections

It is highly recommended that a broadband connection be used instead of dial up.