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Algebra I, Credit Recovery, Part 1 (MTH126A)

Algebra I, Credit Recovery, Part 1 (MTH126A)

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Quick Overview

In this high school credit recovery course, students review the tools of algebra. Topics include the structure and properties of real numbers; operations with integers and other rational numbers; square roots and irrational numbers; linear equations; ratios, proportions, and percentages; the Pythagorean theorem; polynomials; and logic and reasoning. Diagnostic tests assess students' current knowledge and generate individualized study plans, so students can focus on topics that need review.

Teacher-Led Course (one-time payment)   $425.00

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Details

Course Overview

Students are able to gain credit if they have previously completed this course but did not successfully earn credit. For each unit, students take a diagnostic test that assesses their current knowledge of fundamental content. The results of these tests help students create individualized study plans.

In this course, students review the tools of algebra. Topics include the structure and properties of real numbers; operations with integers and other rational numbers; square roots and irrational numbers; linear equations; ratios, proportions, and percentages; the Pythagorean Theorem; polynomials; and logic and reasoning.

Course Outline

SEMESTER ONE

Unit 1: Algebra Basics

The English word algebra and the Spanish word algebrista both come from the Arabic word al-jabr, which means “restoration.” A barber in medieval times often called himself an algebrista. The algebrista also was a bonesetter who restored or fixed bones. Mathematicians today use algebra to solve problems.

  • Semester Introduction
  • Expressions
  • Variables
  • Translating Words into Variable Expressions
  • Equations
  • Translating Words into Equations
  • Replacement Sets
  • Problem Solving
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Unit 2: Properties of Real Numbers 

Every rainbow contains the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. These seven colors form a set with properties that scientists, engineers, and artists use every day. Numbers can also be grouped into sets, and these number sets have properties that can help solve problems.

  • Foundations
  • Number Lines
  • Sets
  • Comparing Expressions
  • Number Properties
  • Distributive Property
  • Algebraic Proof
  • Opposites and Absolute Value
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Unit 3: Operations with Real Numbers

There are many different kinds of numbers. Negative numbers, positive numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals are just a few of the many groups of numbers. What do these varieties of numbers have in common? They all obey the rules of arithmetic. They can be added, subtracted, multiplied, and divided.

  • Foundations
  • Addition 1
  • Addition 2
  • Subtraction
  • Multiplication
  • Reciprocals and Division
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Unit 4: Solving Equations

The Greek mathematician Diophantus is often called “the father of algebra.” His book Arithmetica described the solutions to 130 problems. He did not discover all these solutions himself, but he did collect many solutions that had been found by Greeks, Egyptians, and Babylonians before him. Some people of long ago obviously enjoyed doing algebra. It also helped them solve many real-world problems.

  • Addition and Subtraction Equations
  • Multiplication and Division Equations 1
  • Multiplication and Division Equations 2
  • Multiple Transformations
  • Variables on Both Sides of an Equation
  • Transforming Formulas
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Unit 5: Solving Inequalities

Every mathematician knows that 5 is less than 7, but when is y < x? An inequality symbol can be used to describe how one number compares to another. It can also indicate a relationship between values.

  • Foundations
  • Inequalities
  • Solving Inequalities
  • Combined Inequalities
  • Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities
  • Applications: Inequalities
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Unit 6: Applying Fractions

What do a scale drawing, a bicycle's gears, and a sale at the local store all have in common? They all present problems that can be solved using equations with fractions.

  • Foundations
  • Ratios 1
  • Ratios 2
  • Proportions
  • Your Choice
  • Percents 1
  • Percents 2
  • Applications: Percents
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Unit 7: Linear Equations and Inequalities

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “That’s where I draw the line!” In algebra, this expression can be taken literally. Linear functions and their graphs play an important role in the never-ending quest to model the real world.

  • Foundations
  • Graphs
  • Equations in Two Variables
  • Lines and Intercepts
  • Slope
  • Slope-Intercept Form
  • Point-Slope Form
  • Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
  • Equations from Graphs
  • Applications: Linear Models
  • Graphing Linear Inequalities
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Algebra I A, Unit 8: Systems of Equations

When two people meet, they often shake hands or say "hello" to each other. Once they start talking to each other, they can find out what they have in common. What happens when two lines meet? Do they say anything? Probably not, but whenever two lines meet, you know they have at least one point in common. Finding the point at which they meet can help you solve problems in the real world.

  • Foundations
  • Systems of Equations
  • Substitution Method
  • Linear Combination
  • Applications: Systems of Linear Equations
  • Systems of Linear Inequalities
  • Unit Review
  • Unit Test

Algebra I A, Unit 9: Semester Review and Test

  • Semester Review
  • Semester Test

 

Additional Information

Course Length 4 Months
Prerequisites N/A
Course Materials No
Course Start Date

Courses Taught by a K12 Teacher

Courses with a teacher have designated start dates throughout Fall, Spring, and Summer. Full-year courses last 10 months and semester courses last 4 months. Courses are taught by teachers in K12 International Academy. For details on start dates, click here.

Teacher Assisted Yes, this course is taught by a K12 International Academy teacher. If you are looking for a teacher-supported option with additional flexibility and year-round start dates, click here to learn about the Keystone School, another K12 online private schooling option.
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To use this course, you'll need a computer with an Internet connection.  Some courses require additional free software programs, which you can download from the Internet.

Hardware and Browsers (Minimum Recommendations)

Windows OS

  • CPU: 1.8 GHz or faster processor (or equivalent)

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0 or higher, Mozilla Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher

  • At this time our users are encouraged not to upgrade to Windows 10 or Edge (the new browser)

 

Mac OS

  • CPU: PowerPC G4 1 GHz or faster processor; Intel Core Duo 1.83 GHz or faster processor

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher (Safari is not supported!)

Internet Connections

It is highly recommended that a broadband connection be used instead of dial up.