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5th Grade Art: Topics on American Art

5th Grade Art: Topics on American Art

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Quick Overview

Following the timeline of the K12 History program, Intermediate Art: American A introduces students to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture of North America, from pre-Columbian times through 1877.

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Details

Course Overview

Following the timeline of the K12 History program, Intermediate Art: American A introduces students to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture of North America, from pre-Columbian times through 1877. Students will:

  • Study and create various works, both realistic and abstract, including sketches, masks, architectural models, prints, and paintings
  • Investigate the arts of the American Indians, and Colonial and Federal America
  • Create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques—after studying John James Audubon's extraordinary paintings of birds, students make bird paintings with realistic color and texture, and they make weavings inspired by the colors and patterns of Navajo blankets

Course Outline

The Building Blocks of Art

  • Classify artworks as portrait, self-portrait, landscape, still life, genre, painting, sculpture, or architecture
  • Express reasons for preferring one work of art to another
  • Identify and describe the difference between representational, abstract, and non-representational artworks
  • Identify colors or color schemes in a work of art, such as primary, secondary, intermediate, complementary, warm, cool, and monochromatic
  • Describe the purpose of an artist's sketchbook

Native Peoples of the North

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art of the American Indians of the north, such as Yup'ik finger masks, Eskimo serving dishes, and Northwest Coast totem poles
  • Identify symmetry in artworks

Native Peoples of the Southwest

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art and architecture of the American Indians of the southwest, such as Southwest petroglyphs, Anasazi dwellings, Mimbres pottery, and Navajo weavings
  • Describe events in the lives of Navajo weavers or characteristics of their art

Native Peoples of the East

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art of the American Indians of the east, such as Mound Builder ear spools and Woodland birch bark baskets

Native Peoples of the Plains

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art of the American Indians of the plains, such as a Plains shirt, Nez Perce mask, and a Dakota saddlebag

Early American Art for the Home

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about early American art for the home, such as a sampler by Anna Bateman, a Pennsylvania Dutch decorated chest, Captain Samuel Chandler by Winthrop Chandler, and a stencil

America: Art for the New Nation

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about American Post-Revolutionary art and architecture, such as The Staircase Group by Charles Willson Peale, American Flamingo by John James Audubon, the Massachusetts State House by Charles Bulfinch, The Torn Hat by Thomas Sully, and Minuteman by Daniel Chester French
  • Describe events in the life of John James Audubon or characteristics of his art
  • Identify ways Federal architects were inspired by Classical architecture

America: Untamed Territory

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about American art of the 1800s, such as A View of the Mountain Pass Called the Notch of the White Mountains (Crawford Notch) by Thomas Cole; American Railroad Scene; Snow Bound by Currier and Ives; Rainmaking Among the Mandan by George Catlin; Thunder Storm on Narragansett Bay by Martin Johnson Heade; and a daguerreotype
  • Describe events in the life of George Catlin or characteristics of his art
  • Identify techniques artists use for showing the illusion of space in flat artworks

Additional Information

Course Length 12 Months
Prerequisites N/A
Course Materials No
Course Start Date

Independent Study Courses

Courses can be started any day for independent study courses without a teacher. Full-year courses last 12 months and semester courses last 6 months.

 

Courses Taught by a K12 Teacher

Courses with a teacher have designated start dates throughout Fall and Spring. Full-year courses last 10 months and semester courses last 5 months. Courses are taught by teachers in K12 International Academy. For details on start dates, click here.

Teacher Assisted This course is available in two forms: taught by a teacher or designed for independent use. This teacher-supported course is taught through K12 International Academy. It is also available as independent study, where a parent will guide the course.
  1. A wonderful exploration of Art
    review by Eileen W. on 8/11/2016

    One of the best hidden gems of K12 curriculum is Art. There is a wonderful complement of the history curriculum as your student will study the art of the time period he/she is studying in history. Students learn detailed aspects of the art, the artist, and why that particular art was important for the given time in history. The art curriculum not only allows your child to learn various methods of the art created during the time period, but it explains in great depth about the importance of the style or why the artists were important within time period studied. Students are exposed to a wide variety of great art and learn so much in this course.

To use this course, you'll need a computer with an Internet connection.  Some courses require additional free software programs, which you can download from the Internet.

Hardware and Browsers (Minimum Recommendations)

Windows OS

  • CPU: 1.8 GHz or faster processor (or equivalent)

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Microsoft Internet Explorer 9.0 or higher, Mozilla Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher

  • At this time our users are encouraged not to upgrade to Windows 10 or Edge (the new browser)

 

Mac OS

  • CPU: PowerPC G4 1 GHz or faster processor; Intel Core Duo 1.83 GHz or faster processor

  • RAM: 1GB of RAM

  • Browser: Firefox 10.0 versions or higher, Chrome 17.0 or higher (Safari is not supported!)

Using  Mobile Devices with the Online School

Unfortunately, many portable devices do not support the software products required to run the Online School. These devices may include (but not limited to): Chromebooks, iPads, iPhones, iPods, Kindles, eReaders, and Andriod phones.

Internet Connections

It is highly recommended that a broadband connection be used instead of dial up.